What steps do I take if I am involved in an Auto Accident?

Winston-Salem, NC 9/16/2014

Auto accidents are very common occurrences. In fact, there were 10.8 million auto accidents in 2011. Chances are that at some point in your life you will be involved in one. It may be a minor collision in a parking lot, or a serious event involving bodily injury. Regardless of the circumstances, knowing what to do in the aftermath is extremely important.

Failure to follow the proper procedures may result in the denial of your insurance claim by your carrier . You may also face fines if you do not follow proper legal procedures. Please continue reading for the exact steps you should follow if you are in a car wreck:   

 

  1. Protect yourself, your auto and any other property from further damage.
  2. Call the police as soon as possible if someone is injured, damage is extensive, your vehicle has been stolen, or if you need assistance.
  3. Do not discuss whether you are liable for the accident, even if you think you may be responsible. If anyone asks you to sign a statement, do not sign it unless it is authorized by your insurance carrier. While waiting on the police to arrive, you may speak to the other drivers, but speak only to the police about the accident.
  4. Take the time to fill out the information on the card (linked below) while you are at the accident scene. This will help you later when you fill out the formal claim report that you will need to file with your carrier. If you do not have a copy of the form in your glove box, you need to get contact information from each individual involved in the accident. If there are witnesses, please get their contact information as well. You need to write down the name, address and phone number for each person. Also make a note of the color, make and model of each vehicle involved. Taking a picture of the vehicles before they are moved can be very important. The pictures may prove how the accident happened or show the force of the collision. They can also provide evidence if the accident caused injuries. If you have injuries, such as bruising, get pictures of this as well.
  5. Report the claim to us or to your carrier's closest branch office as soon as possible. For your convenience, you can also report the claim on our website under the Personal Section.
  6. When you have an opportunity, make notes to yourself about the accident. Include as much information about it as possible while it is still fresh in your mind. Explain how the accident happened. You may also want to draw a sketch or diagram of the collision. This will aid your memory in the future.
  7. If you are a commercial driver, let your employer know about the accident as soon as possible.

 

Please Click Here  for access a convenient form to store in your glove box that details these steps and provides a form for taking further claim information from other parties.

Drive Safely!

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